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Resources2018-08-17T13:35:50+00:00

Pet Health Resources

The following is not a substitute for veterinary care and should only be used if your pet is otherwise acting normally and the vomiting has not lasted longer than 24 hours.

A sudden onset of an upset stomach or acute gastritis can often be remedied by giving the stomach time to rest. The schedule below provides that time for the stomach.

Today:

  • Give no food.
  • Wait 12 hours from the last episode of vomiting to give a small amount of water. Then start offering small amounts of water and ice frequently.

Tomorrow: 24 hours after the last episode of vomiting

  • Continue providing fresh water to your pet.
  • Start offering small amounts of bland food like boiled white rice
  • Offer 1 tsp unflavored yogurt with an active bacterial culture such as Dannon’s

Day 3: 48 hours following the last episode of vomiting

  • Slowly transition back to regular food. Give small amounts at a time.
  • If vomiting continues, please call us at (803) 366-8188.

The following is not a substitute for veterinary care and should only be used if your pet is otherwise acting normally and the diarrhea has not lasted longer than 48 hours.

A sudden onset of diarrhea can sometimes be remedied by giving the intestines time to rest and something bland to eat so it is easily digestible. Diarrhea lasting longer than 48 hours often requires veterinary attention.

Today:

  • Offer plenty of fresh water to your pet.
  • Offer small amounts of boiled white rice 4 to 6 times
  • Offer 1 tsp unflavored yogurt with an active bacterial culture such as Dannon’s

Tomorrow:

  • If your pet’s stool is returning to normal, continue the bland rice and yogurt in small amounts 4 to 6 times a day.

Day 3:

  • If the stool is normal slowly start adding back regular food, continuing to feed small amounts frequently.

Day 4:

  • If the stool remains normal, you can return to your pet’s normal diet and a normal amount.

The following is not a substitute for veterinary care and should only be used if your pet is otherwise acting normally and the scratching or swelling is minimal.

Give your pet 1mg/lb of Benadryl every 8 to 12 hours.

  • A 25 lb dog would get 1 25 mg tablet every 8 to 12 hours.
  • A 50 lb dog would get 2 25 mg tablet every 8 to 12 hours.
  • A 6 lb dog would get ½ teaspoon of liquid Benadryl (12.5mg/tsp).
  • A 12 lb dog would get 1 teaspoon of liquid Benadryl (12.5 mg/tsp).

Give your pet Benadryl 1mg/lb 1 hour prior to travel. This can be repeated every 8 hours if needed.

  • A 25 lb dog would get 1 25 mg tablet.
  • A 50 lb dog would get 2 25 mg tablets.
  • A 6 lb dog would get ½ teaspoon of liquid Benadryl (12.5 mg/tsp).
  • A 12 lb dog would get 1 teaspoon of liquid Benadryl (12.5 mg/tsp).

Eating feces otherwise known as coprophagia is not usually a sign of a medical problem; however it is a disgusting habit. Below are a few tips that may help:

Important points in treatment

  1. Remove the feces from the premises daily.
  2. Prevent access to the cat’s litter box.
  3. Provide regular exercise.
  4. Consider changing the pet’s food. Change from high fiber foods to low fiber.
  5. Negative reinforcement for the behavior such as booby trapping the feces with a hot sauce may be helpful.
  6. Try adding FORBID to the pet’s food on a daily basis. This monosodium glutamate product will impart a disagreeable taste to the pet’s own stool. It will help stop coprophagia 50% of the time.
  7. Ingestion of feces is a common manner in which pets become infected with intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasites can be contagious to people and other pets. Please have your veterinarian check your pet’s stool periodically for intestinal worms.
  8. If these tips do not help, or if your pet demonstrates other signs of illness such as weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, change in water consumption or urinations, please have your pet examined by a veterinarian.

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